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Tuesday, October 17, 2017

Sean Kelly

TADFF17: Impossible Horror

Full Disclosure: I was a contributor to Impossible Horror's IndieGoGo campaign

Two women investigate the source of a nightly phenomenon known as "The Scream" in Impossible Horror. Lily (Haley Walker) is an aspiring filmmaker, who begins experiencing strange events at night, often accompanied by the sound of screaming. On one of these nights, Lily meets a girl named Hannah (Creedance Wright), who explains to her the phenomenon known as "The Scream," which occurs every night between 12 and 5. Lily and Hannah team up to investigate The Scream and film the results, though they soon realize that those who investigate The Scream often end up going crazy.

Impossible Horror is the sophomore film from director Justin Decloux (Teddy Bomb). Probably the best description of the film would be that Impossible Horror is a delightfully weird homage to horror filmmaking. Not only is Impossible Horror a horror film itself, but it also comments on the process of making such films. Among the many films referenced in Impossible Horror include The Ring, The Blair Witch Project and The Shining. There is even a fight scene in the film reminiscent of John Carpenter's They Live.

Impossible Horror is a very different film from Justin Decloux's ultra-gory debut Teddy Bomb. There is a much slower pace to Impossible Horror and the entire first act of the film is told practically without dialogue. The film does maintain Decloux's sense of humour throughout, though there are also some truly spooky moments in the film, especially scenes that involve a ghost that haunts Lily's apartment. While Impossible Horror does get progressively more weird as it goes on, it is still a solid sophomore effort for Justin Decloux.

8 / 10 stars
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Sean Kelly

About Sean Kelly -

Sean Patrick Kelly is a self-described ├╝ber-geek, who has been an avid film lover for all his life. He graduated from York University in 2010 with an honours B.A. in Cinema and Media Studies and he likes to believe he knows what he’s talking about when he writes about film (despite occasionally going on pointless rants).