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Tuesday, May 03, 2016

Sean Kelly

Hot Docs 2016: How to Build a Time Machine

Two men dream of building a time machine in How to Build a Time Machine. It was in 1895 when H.G. Wells wrote his novel The Time Machine, which inspired many on the possibilities of time travel. Having gone to see the 1960 film adaptation of The Time Machine as a kid, filmmaker and animator Rob Niosi has set out to construct an exact scale replica of the prob from the film, a project that takes over more than a decade of his life. On the other hand, Ron Mallett devoted his life to a career in theoretical physics, with the goal of turning time travel from science fiction to science fact.

There probably isn't a person on the planet, who doesn't have something in the past that they would like to change. Time travel has been part of the public imagination for decades and has been a key element of science fiction films, such as The Time Machine, Back to the Future, and Looper. How to Build a Time Machine looks at two separate approaches to the titular subject, one being the reconstruction of the time machine prop and the other being the research into real scientific time travel. Both stories are joined together the immense passion and dedication of Rob Niosi and Ron Mallet, as they try to achieve their dreams.

How to Build a Time Machine is the second documentary by filmmaker Jay Cheel (Beauty Day) and there is quite a notable technical improvement from his last film. The film features some exquisite and well-edited cinematography, as well as a great soundtrack. How to Build a Time Machine is filled with much humor and heart and it ends up being a very inspirational story that will make you believe that anything is possible, including time travel.

10 / 10 stars
  LOVED IT  

Screenings:

Sean Kelly

About Sean Kelly -

Sean Patrick Kelly is a self-described ├╝ber-geek, who has been an avid film lover for all his life. He graduated from York University in 2010 with an honours B.A. in Cinema and Media Studies and he likes to believe he knows what he’s talking about when he writes about film (despite occasionally going on pointless rants).