Friday, March 27, 2015

Sean Kelly

Canadian Film Fest 2015: Late Night Double Feature

LNDFIt is horror mayhem on basic cable in the anthology film Late Night Double Feature.  Following the nightly news, viewers of TV13 in Peterborough are treated to Dr. Nasty’s Cavalcade of Horror, where Dr. Nasty (Brian Scott Carleton) and his assistant Nurse Nasty (Jamie Elizabeth Sampson) present a double bill of terror. In the first film Dinner for Monsters, a chef (Nick Smyth) is brought in to cook a meal for a group of six.  However, he is shocked by the main ingredient.  Then in Slit, a man named Brad (Colin Price) is hired by people to cut into them.  However, he gets more than he bargained for with his latest client.

Late Night Double Feature is a horror anthology that takes the form of a late night cable access program.  The film goes the whole nine yards with this premise, with the film beginning with a news broadcast and featuring trailers and commercials in between the films.  This results in Late Night Double Feature being easily compared to Grindhouse, even though the two “features” are merely short films.  The framing story of Dr. Nasty’s Cavalcade of Horror actually evolves into a third story, involving how dissatisfied Nurse Nasty (aka Samantha) is with her treatment on the program.

Late Night Double Feature makes the somewhat bold move of shifting the tone between the two central features from darky humorous to just plain dark and disturbing. In fact, the second feature Slit can almost be described as torture porn in some ways and, while it would make one hell of a stand alone short, it sort of clashes with the tone of the rest of the film.  Altogether, while the film does not have a perfect execution, Late Night Double Feature still has a great premise and is worth checking out by horror fans.

★ ★ ★ 1/2 | FAIR 

Sean Kelly

About Sean Kelly -

Sean Patrick Kelly is a self-described ├╝ber-geek, who has been an avid film lover for all his life. He graduated from York University in 2010 with an honours B.A. in Cinema and Media Studies and he likes to believe he knows what he’s talking about when he writes about film (despite occasionally going on pointless rants).