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Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Sean Kelly

TIFF14: TIFF Docs Highlights

RogerandMe

It seems that I become a bigger fan of the documentary medium with each passing year and I look forward to the interesting slate of docs that are announced for the Toronto International Film Festival.  The highlight of this year’s TIFF Docs programme is a 25th anniversary screening of Michael Moore’s debut film Roger & Me, which will include a new digital restoration of the film.  The rest of this year’s line-up is filled with familiar names and interesting subjects.

Here are some of the documentaries that will be playing at TIFF this year:

Merchants of Doubt - Robert Kenner, USA - Canadian Premiere
From the director of Food Inc. comes this investigation of the shadowy world of skeptics.

National Gallery - Frederick Wiseman, France/USA - North American Premiere
It almost seems at this point that observational cinema master Frederick Wiseman has become a permanent fixture of the TIFF Docs programme. His latest film takes a look at London’s National Gallery.

Seymour: An Introduction - Ethan Hawke, USA - International Premiere
Ethan Hawke directs a documentary about  the life and lessons of pianist, teacher and sage, Seymour Bernstein.

Tales of the Grim Sleeper - Nick Broomfield, USA/United Kingdom - World Premiere
True crime stories are always intriguing and this film about the Los Angeles serial killer is no exception.

The Look of Silence - Joshua Oppenheimer, Denmark/Indonesia/Norway/Finland/United Kingdom - Canadian Premiere
In this follow-up to the Oscar-nominated The Act of Killing, the youngest brother of a victim of the Indonesian genocide confronts the men responsible.

That wraps up my highlights of the TIFF Docs programme. Please check the TIFF website for the full list and more details.

Sean Kelly

About Sean Kelly -

Sean Patrick Kelly is a self-described ├╝ber-geek, who has been an avid film lover for all his life. He graduated from York University in 2010 with an honours B.A. in Cinema and Media Studies and he likes to believe he knows what he’s talking about when he writes about film (despite occasionally going on pointless rants).